Making Your Voter Registration and Voting Quick & Easy

Making Your Voter Registration and Voting Quick & Easy

Millennial and Gen Z voting are critical to defeating Trump. As we know, one must be registered to vote in your state of residence first. We provide important information and links for those residing in the 5 key states to make it easier for you to register. We also describe the approach to registering for those residing in the additional 45 states if you are not yet a registered voter. You must be at least 18 years of age on November 3, 2020 and a U.S. citizen to vote—you will be asked this. You will also be asked for your address in the state where you are a resident and intend to vote, along with some documentation information. You are a U.S. citizen if you were born or naturalized in the U.S.

You can get a lot of detailed voting information by clicking on your resident state on the ‘Election Protection 866 Our Vote’ map here. This site features translations into 7 different languages, and contact phone numbers to report any voting irregularities you observe.

key-state-voting-facts

 

Important points:

  1. Pay attention to the indicated voter registration deadline for your state — usually 30 days or less before the election date. Register now so you don’t miss your state’s registration deadline. This will also give yourself more time to apply for an absentee ballot or early voting (see 3. and 4. just below), if available in your state of residence.

  2. Students, do you attend college or a vocational school in one of the 5 key states? You can register and vote in that state and make a difference!

  3. You can register to vote at age 17 if you will turn 18 by November 3, 2020.

  4. Consider voting by using the absentee ballot method if that is offered in your state. Absentee ballots allow you to mail or turn in your ballot before election day, if you are possibly going to be too busy or not able to go to the polls on November 3, 2020. In most states, you must be registered to vote before applying for an absentee ballot. Early voting, another possibility, means a qualified voter may turn in their ballot in person during a prescribed period prior to the November 3 election day. Avoid the long lines and possible Covid exposure, as well as the election day climate or personal issues that can occur!
     

    Check on your state map here, to see if your state allows absentee voting and early voting (see Tip 4. below).

    WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND YOU USE ONE OF THESE TWO EARLY VOTING TECHNIQUES, AND SUBMIT YOUR BALLOT TO THE DESIGNATED LOCATION BY OCTOBER 27.

    The Covid pandemic is resulting in many states changing their rules, so check the latest.

  5. Four Tips:

    • You can also get your location information where to turn in your ballot here<.

    • To minimize questions, make sure your ballot signature looks as much as possible like the signature on your state ID. This is important!

    • You do not need to vote on every issue on your ballot: selective voting is OK. Just voting for Biden is fine.

    • In many states you can also check online to see if your ballot has been recorded. Do it if your state is one.

Registering to Vote: Residents of the Key States

See our discussion of why the key states (Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin) were selected here. Review your key state information above. Online registration is available 24/7 in three states. Unfortunately, Michigan and North Carolina do not allow online registration, so you will need to complete and mail in a voter registration card–PDF found here. All five states allow absentee ballots and early voting, though Pennsylvania is somewhat restrictive about allowing them.

We will also be watching certain Republican voting states–such as Arizona–that look like they might flip in 2020. Here is Arizona’s voter registration information.

1) Florida

Online registration is allowed! Here is the link to register online:
https://registertovoteflorida.gov/home

The deadline to register is October 5, 2020, 29 days before the election.

You will need your Florida Driver’s License or ID Card number and its issue date, along with the last four numbers of your (nine-digit) Social Security number to register online. The local Supervisor of Elections will issue your Voter Identification Card. If you do not have any or all of the information above, you may still use the online system to prefill a voter registration application form. However, you will have to print, sign, and then mail or deliver your completed voter registration application (described under Registering to Vote Generally, below) to your county Supervisor of Elections’ office.

If you want, once you receive your card you can apply for an absentee ballot here:
https://www.vote.org/absentee-ballot/florida/

An email address will be required to apply for an absentee ballot.

Florida also allows early voting, beginning the 3rd Wednesday before the election and ending at 1 pm the Saturday before the election.

2) Michigan

No online registration, so complete the registration card here. You must have resided in the city or township where you have lived for 30 days by November 3, 2020. The deadline to register is October 4, 2020, 30 days before the election.

Send the completed and signed registration card to:
Michigan Department of State
Bureau of Elections
P.O. Box 20126
Lansing, Michigan 48901-0726

Note Michigan requires that the address on your voter registration and Driver’s License (or ID card) be the same, so they will amend your license (or ID card) address should they differ. To register, you will need to enter your date of birth in Box 4. In Box 6, enter your Michigan Driver’s License or Personal Identification card number. If you have neither, then you will need to enter the last four numbers of your (nine-digit) Social Security number. If you have no Social Security number, then enter NONE. A number will be assigned. You do not need to make entries in Boxes 5, 7, or 8. You should receive notification of your registration in the mail.

Once you are registered, you can download to apply for an absentee ballot application here, including a fillable version:
https://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,4670,7-127-1633_8716_8728-21037–,00.html

You can check a box if you want to vote absentee in all future elections. The absentee ballot application must be returned to your city/township clerk found here:
https://mvic.sos.state.mi.us/

Michigan also allows early in person voting, beginning 40 days before the election and ending 1 day before the election.

3) North Carolina

No online registration, so complete the registration card here, sign and send here:
State Board of Elections
P.O. Box 27255
Raleigh, North Carolina 27611-7255

The deadline to register is October 9, 2020, 25 days before the election. You will need to enter your Motor Vehicle ID number or your Driver’s License number. If you have neither, then you will need the last four numbers of your (nine digit) Social Security number.

Enter your chosen political party if you want to vote in that party’s primary. For the Race or Ethnic group box, the instructions confusingly indicate that you are required to fill out this box. However your application will not be rejected if you fail to do so. See page two for possible race or ethnic groups.

North Carolina does allow absentee ballots:
https://www.ncsbe.gov/voting-options/absentee-voting

Here is the absentee ballot form and instructions, to be completed once you receive notification you are registered to vote:
https://www.ncsbe.gov/absentee-voting-mail

North Carolina also allows early voting, beginning 10 days before the election and ending 3 days before the election. Get all the details here.

4) Pennsylvania

Online registration is allowed! Here is the link to register online:
https://www.votespa.com/Register-to-Vote/Pages/How-to-Use-Online-Voter-Registration.aspx

The deadline to register is October 5, 2020, 29 days before the election.

You will need your Pennsylvania Driver’s License or DOT ID Card number. If you have none, then enter the last four numbers of your (nine digit) Social Security number.

You will need to enter your birthdate and gender. Entering one’s race, phone number or email address are optional. Your address can not be a PO Box. Indicate a political party if you want to vote in that party’s primary election.

Pennsylvania does allow absentee ballot voting if you are eligible—pretty restrictive though, see here:
https://www.pa.gov/guides/voting-and-elections/#AbsenteeBallot

If you are eligible, here is the page to find the form on. The form must be filed no later than a week before the election:
https://www.votespa.com/Voting-in-PA/Pages/Voting-by-Absentee-Ballot.aspx

A recent 2020 change now provides for early voting in Pennsylvania! See the information here, excerpted from the PA.gov website. You can apply for your mail-in ballot starting 50 days before the election, September 14 by our count. But must file for this by October 27.

5) Wisconsin

Online registration is allowed! Here is the link to register online:
https://myvote.wi.gov/en-US/VoterRegistration

Wisconsin first asks you to enter your name and date of birth, to ensure you are not already registered to vote.

You will need a valid unexpired Wisconsin driver’s license or a state ID card to register online. (Otherwise mail in a completed registration card to register.) Your voter registration needs to match the name, address and date of birth on file at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). You can update your address with the DMV to match, before filing online to register. Use MyVote to file an address update. https://myvote.wi.gov/en-us/UpdateMyAddress

You must have resided at your current address 10 consecutive days.

The deadline to register is October 14, 2020, 20 days before the election. There are some liberal rules to register later at the county clerk’s office.

Wisconsin does allow absentee ballots. Here is the link to request to vote by absentee ballot once you are registered:
https://myvote.wi.gov/en-us/VoteAbsentee

Wisconsin also allows early in person voting at clerk’s offices, beginning 14 days before the election and ending the Sunday before the election.


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Registering to Vote Generally

Not registered to vote yet? The federal government has created a very useful starting point,

https://vote.gov/

Using its dropdown box, select the state where you reside. Then click on the ‘Find out how to register’ red box. Many states allow you to register online. If your state does, you should see something similar to California’s Start your online registration that you can click on. You should then be immediately routed to the Online Voter Registration Website of your state of residency.

Read the registration information for your state discussed on its home page. For example, the California home page tells you their deadline requires you to register more than 2 weeks before the election to vote in that election. The California home page also mentions that to register online requires:

  • Your California driver’s license or California identification card number,
  • The last four digits of your social security number, and
  • Your date of birth.

After getting the information together that your state of residency requires, click on your state home box that says ‘Register to Vote Now’ (or something similar). Complete all the requested information and click the submit (or similar) button.

If your state does not allow online registration, complete the standard registration form: instructions can be found on page 3 and the application on page 4. Be sure to also read your state’s instructions that begin alphabetically on page 8. Follow your state’s instructions, sign the form and mail it in. You should receive a confirmation you are registered within a few weeks, if all is OK. You can then apply for an absentee ballot if you want, if your state allows for it.

Reminder: Check your state map found here, to see if your state allows absentee voting and/or early voting.

Note: Information as of May 1, 2020.
Contact us if you are aware of any changes to the above information.


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